Card of the Day: The Fool

0 Fool082815The fool drifts through space unconcerned and weightless (without care). Accompanying him are a dog, a walking staff, a suitcase, a cap, and a feather. Seven colored stones sit on the cliff he is falling past, or more accurately, is it drifting past. A sun emblem decorates his tunic. Purple, snow-topped mountains are seen in the distance, and behind them a white sun in a pale yellow sky.

Symbols unique to the card:

One of the distinguishing characteristics of the Sage Tarot Fool is that he is already falling through space instead of stepping off the cliff. The fool represents our soul or essence. The essence is captured in that moment of the free fall of incarnation, forgetting past lives and trusting completely in the process.

In the bag which falls with the fool, and which is painted with the eye of horus, are the four tools of the magician, the cup, the sword (or knife), the wand. The fool doesn’t necessarily know they are there—he has not needed them until this journey—but they are there for him to use, nonetheless.

The eye of Horus, covering the bag, is the egyptian symbol of protection, royal power, and good health. Horus is the child of Isis (understanding) and Osiris (Wisdom) and represents the light of intuition, something that the fool will always be in touch with on his journey of embodiment.

Once in the hat of the fool, and now floating with him is the feather of Maat. In ancient Egypt, souls of the dead were judged by weighing them against a feather. Those souls that were as light as a feather were considered unburdened with sin and evil, and were allowed to pass into the kingdom of Osiris. The feather flies with the fool to remind us the pure state of our soul entering this life.

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